holistic health imagery

Archive for February, 2009

Health is a Journey

Wednesday, February 4th, 2009

Health is a journey. We refer to our health as one static thing, when in reality, it’s a living, breathing (literally) entity. It’s you. You are your health.

Your health is nothing less than the sum of everything that you are–emotions, thoughts, feelings, your energy levels, the quality of your sleep and digestion. It changes from moment to moment. Everything you do, every choice you make affects your health, as do at least a few factors outside of your control.

Health can be seen as the physical substance of your body–your bone density, the quality of nutrients in your bloodstream, your sex hormones, and so much more, along with the energetic work potential that develops from the physical material substances of life. Out of all of this substance, movement, and potential, develops the intangibles–happiness, joy, contentment, satisfaction, and harmony. Organs and organ systems act in concert, move in unison, and conspire to create more health, more vitality, more joy.

States of disease are characterized by disharmony, by decreased (subjective) levels of vitality and energy, are marked by discord between organs and organ systems, and a degradation in emotional and mental states.

One can be extremely old, but very healthy, and enjoy a deep sense of well-being and quality of life. Conversely, young, strong people may experience states of dis-ease, disharmony, pain, and emotional instability because those young, strong organs are not harmoniously cooperating.

Organs do not spontaneously develop states of imbalance. Any organ’s functioning is strongly influenced by mental and emotional states, over which we have a strikingly large degree of conscious control. Long-term, or even short-term high-intensity emotionally discordant states, such as an excess of grief, sadness, anger, worry, excessive mentation, even excessive joy, all will degrade the functioning of the organ for which that emotion is associated.

The resulting imbalance is like a tent with one of its poles missing or bent–the entire structure sags into asymmetry in one spot, and pushes too tightly in another, distorting the balance of the entire structure.

When evaluating a person’s overall health condition, one must look deeply at the function of each individual organ, but also see all functions within the greater context of one’s life and relations.

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